Federal Reserve

Sovereign Debt Risks Grow as Stimulus Pumps Asset Prices

Paul Farrell provides ten worthwhile observations in his forecast of a coming banking crisis. Essentially, he argues against buying stocks in an environment where market indices are about 70% off their lows. He sees two stock markets in America — one for the rich and another for everyone else. He explains how Wall Street skims from Main Street, rigs markets, and grasps vast winnings from socially worthless activities.

Is The Poor Housing Market A Genetic Disease?

What should people make of the proposal for a nationwide government initiated program where banks take ownership of homes, then rent them to persons in mortgage default? Will it happen on a large scale? Not likely. But central bank monetization of federal fiscal deficits is likely as a means of stabilizing home prices, thus reducing foreclosures and their impacts on communities.

Heal Job Market By Cultural Renewal, Not Fed Intervention

No.: 
85

Americans have been reminded of at least two things of late: In the end, deflation is significantly about jobs. Secondly, and also according to Ben Bernanke, while we wait for the jobs we must realize that “central bankers alone cannot solve the world’s economic problems.” These may be the most important words Bernanke has uttered during his tenure as Fed chief.

Federal Debt Feeds the Wall Street Machine

No.: 
73

A contradictory investment climate exists because the Fed is feeding Wall Street with so much money. Hedge funds and investment banks don’t care that short-term Treasuries pay next to nothing. They buy Treasuries as collateral in up-leveraging speculative plays, especially in commodities. Wall Street elites expect to recoup the losses of 2008 as well as to grasp massive new profits, even if major indexes top out short of their former highs later this year or next year.

Wall Street Banks: Too Big To Discipline?

No.: 
69

In 2009 the leading issue of moral hazard was “too big to fail.” Not surprisingly, the more things change, the more they stay the same. As the congressional bank hearings of 2010 unfold, the new touchstone of moral hazard is “too big to discipline.” The heads of Morgan Stanley, J.P Morgan and Bank of America argue that they cannot be reproved in practice or disciplined by being broken up because their gargantuan size is necessary for the health of American banking in a global environment. ‘Make us pay, and you’ll pay,’ is their mantra!

America's Debt Addiction Is Like 1800's Slavery

No.: 
68

Darrell Delamaide argues that President Obama must stimulate the U.S. economy sufficiently to boost employment figures in the near-term, otherwise Democrats will court a political disaster next year. However, the idea of America is far more consequential than today’s interest group driven party goals. In reality, Delamaide is not arguing for stimulus as much as he is arguing against the GOP. A better argument is to replace both reckless, feckless political parties and get the nation’s budgetary affairs in order.

The Fed's Free Money Fuels New Bubble

No.: 
67

Is irrational exuberance making a comeback at the Fed’s invitation? Irwin Kellner thinks so, arguing that the “humongous volume” of Fed injected liquidity invites a speculative fever. The Fed’s bogus money has not produced consumer price inflation because the wealthy beneficiaries of the liquidity are keeping it engaged in speculative pursuits, with little trickling down to consumers.

Reasons for Optimism in the Long Haul

No.: 
66

Has America lost its soul? Is America too immoral and shortsighted to allow prudent capitalism to work properly? (Yes.) Is the Canadian hedge fund manager, Erick Sprott correct that the U.S. government is now a “dead man walking,” with central bank intervention the main dynamic that allows the U.S. Treasury to roll over government debt at low interest rates? (Marketwatch, Oct. 20, 2009).

Speculation Will Not Cure What Ails Us

No.: 
57

It is time to dismantle the central bank conspiracy. In countering the cabal, Farrell urges the reading of William Greider’s July 15 essay,“Dismantling the Temple”. Greider provides an exposition of the Fed’s calamitous financial biases and regulatory deficiencies. Furthermore, he draws attention to the bipartisan idea that the U.S.

For the Fed, God is Dead

No.: 
56

Make no mistake, Fed Chair Ben Bernanke believes the Federal Reserve stands a fighting chance of re-inflating many segments of the economy and most categories of paper asset prices. Shrewdly, he is less confident that the Fed’s operations will result in a satisfactory recovery of America’s lost jobs. Fed Chair Bernanke can speak of the ongoing financial crisis as the worst since the Great Depression because his rescue of the banking industry will leave many Americans in the lurch.

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